Family Language Alive - Children Learning Chinese

Situation #2.7: I really need my child to learn Chinese so he can speak to his grandparents…

September 26, 2010

2.7 Main Article

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Situation #2.7: I really need my child to learn Chinese so he can speak to his grandparents.Reality: That is a noble reason in itself. Learning Chinese has other familial benefits as well. Something is better to be passed on using a native language, like myths and folklore, family values and beliefs, understanding and wisdom, personal experiences, traditions and culture. The use of a native language allows family members to express their thoughts more genuinely and intimately. It may not be a reason that associates with benefits that are worldly useful or even long-lived, but these are priceless benefits that make impressions and lasting memories for a child.

Considerations:

 

  • Which other immediate or extended family members speak Chinese? Would there be more intimate bonding if Chinese is used?
  • What other familial benefits are there if my child uses Chinese (e.g. sibling bonding; elderly neighbors)?
  • How blissful would my parents or parents-in-law be if they can communicate with their grandchild in Chinese? Is my effort to change how things work now worth that blissful reward, especially if they have already started to communicate with my child in English already?

 

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September 15, 2013

Grandparents’ Mumble Jumble

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Picture 1485m small

Is there a deep down reason why they complain about our children not knowing enough Chinese? Even when they themselves know some English, it seems that they still feel quite special when their grand kids respond in accented Chinese, or when they receive cards written in jagged Chinese characters. Perhaps deep down, they yearn for that respect they feel they deserve as the ethnic ancestors to their descendents, as the ones who are important enough to pass down what once belong to them to the next generations to come.

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